Map by Stony Brook University: School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences and The Nature Conservancy

Map by Stony Brook University: School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences and The Nature Conservancy

Nitrogen pollution from sewage and fertilizers, pesticides, toxic chemicals and pharmaceutical drugs flow from the ground into our bays and harbors, negatively impacting our environment, economy and public health by:

Threatening the health of our families because even exposure to low doses of chemicals and pesticides will affect us over time.

Damaging salt marshes which help protect coastlines from damaging storms like Hurricane Sandy.

Killing sea grasses that provide vital habitat for economically important fish and shellfish.

Fueling harmful algae blooms, like red tide, brown tide and harmful blue green algae, which close the beaches where we recreate and poison the shellfish we eat.

Closing the fisheries and shellfisheries on which our maritime economy depends.

 Brown Tide is the excessive growth of a type of marine algae (Aureococcus anophagefferens). Blooms of the Brown Tide organism literally turn the water deep brown, making it unappealing to swimmers and fishermen. I it not harmful to humans, but Brown Tide is a problem for bay scallops and eelgrass, and to a lesser degree other finfish and shellfish. Brown Tide is unlike most other algal blooms because of its unusually high concentrations, the extent of area it covers and the length of time it persists.

Brown Tide is the excessive growth of a type of marine algae (Aureococcus anophagefferens). Blooms of the Brown Tide organism literally turn the water deep brown, making it unappealing to swimmers and fishermen. I it not harmful to humans, but Brown Tide is a problem for bay scallops and eelgrass, and to a lesser degree other finfish and shellfish. Brown Tide is unlike most other algal blooms because of its unusually high concentrations, the extent of area it covers and the length of time it persists.

 Toxic Red Tide is the excessive growth of a type of marine algae (Alexandrium).  Blooms of Alexandrium take on a red or brown color. Alexandrium produces a toxin called Saxitoxin, which can accumulates in filter-feeding shellfish (clams, scallops, oysters etc.) and cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) if ingested.  Toxic Red Tides are common in Long Island bays between April and June.

Toxic Red Tide is the excessive growth of a type of marine algae (Alexandrium).  Blooms of Alexandrium take on a red or brown color. Alexandrium produces a toxin called Saxitoxin, which can accumulates in filter-feeding shellfish (clams, scallops, oysters etc.) and cause Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning (PSP) if ingested.  Toxic Red Tides are common in Long Island bays between April and June.

 Ulva, or sea lettuce, is a type of marine macro-algae that looks like bright green sheets of seaweed. Nitrogen pollution from sewage and waste water can result in the excessive growth of Ulva and lead to its accumulation on Long Island's western beaches. The accumulation of Ulva is not only unsightly, but results in the release of sulfur fumes that can pose a serious health risk.

Ulva, or sea lettuce, is a type of marine macro-algae that looks like bright green sheets of seaweed. Nitrogen pollution from sewage and waste water can result in the excessive growth of Ulva and lead to its accumulation on Long Island's western beaches. The accumulation of Ulva is not only unsightly, but results in the release of sulfur fumes that can pose a serious health risk.